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Teapot Ornament

by Patricia Kessler

Ornament Teapot

One of our most popular articles, has been the Ornament Exchange article in the Winter 2010 issue of Living Crafts. We had so many beautiful projects as a result, that not all of them could fit in the printed magazine. After the printed issue came out we were able to also offer four of them on our Craft Room as free patterns. They are still there and you can click here and scroll down to upload them.

Ornament Box

One of my favorites, is this adorable teapot, which can be used both as an ornament, or for your child’s play:

Symbol: Teapot represents Friendship

In Patricia’s words: “The teapot is a symbol of warmth, friendship, relaxation and tranquility—one cannot prepare and drink tea quickly! The blue embroidery motif on the teapot was inspired by Dutch pottery designs and happily reminds me of the four years I spent living in the Netherlands. The teapot can be completed by someone with intermediate hand-sewing skills. You may sew the lid on completely, or sew only on one side so that you have a hinged lid to allow someone to enjoy finding tiny treasures hidden within!”

Materials

1 Piece of cream or white felt, 20 cm x 30 cm
Small amount of wool stuffing
Cream embroidery thread to match felt
Blue embroidery thread
Embroidery needle
1 Blue bead

Teapot Pattern Download

NOTE: Keep the construction stitches very small. The construction stitches should be secondary to the overall shape of the teapot and to the blue embroidery stitching.

Transfer all patterns to felt and cut out all of the teapot parts. Cut six teapot panels, two handles, two spouts, one bottom piece, and one of each of the lid pieces.

Pattern Pieces

Sew the two handle pieces together with a small overcast stitch. Sew the two spout pieces together with a small overcast stitch, leaving a small space for stuffing. Stuff with a tiny piece of wool stuffing. This is done easily by wrapping wool stuffing around a toothpick, then sliding the wool-covered toothpick into the spout and inserting the stuffing.

Spout

Form a slight cone shape from the teapot lid top section and sew seam with overcast stitch. Sew a small blue bead to the tip of the teapot top with blue thread, hiding the knots on the underside. Sew bottom piece of lid to top piece, leaving a small space for stuffing. Stuff the teapot lid slightly and sew closed.

Using the embroidery pattern, embroider two panels with blue thread, using French knots, straight stitch, and back stitches.

Position the finished teapot spout between two blank panels and sew the panels together, with the spout sandwiched in at the edge, using a small overcast stitch. When you come to the spout, use tiny straight stitches, then continue with the overcast stitch.

Position the finished teapot handle between two blank panels and sew the panels together, with the handle sandwiched in at the edges, using a small overcast stitch. When you come to each section of the handle, use tiny straight stitches, then continue with the overcast stitch.

Handle

Using a small overcast stitch, sew the six panels together one after another to form a cylinder shape. Place the embroidered panels between the two finished spout and handle sections. You will now have a cylinder shape, open at both ends. Be careful to sew them in the proper order.

Panels

Stuff this shape with plenty of wool to make a firm teapot body. Carefully sew the bottom of the teapot onto the body. Add more stuffing if needed. You may also wish to add some scented items to your teapot such as a crushed cinnamon stick, lavender, mint, etc.

Stuffing

Stitch the finished teapot lid onto the body with a few stitches on either side of the lid.

Stitch finished teapot

Finished ornaments

Posted by Living Crafts on Dec 20, 2010 07:53 AM | 16 Comments

16 Responses to “Teapot Ornament”

  1. Raymond S. says:

    What a short stout little teapot!

  2. Doris says:

    Bellisimo!!!!! Muchas gracias.
    Besos.

  3. Connie says:

    This is the most adorable thing I have seen in a long time. I really love it!

  4. Nilufer Talu says:

    Oh yeah it is so cute… Great object of domesticity…

  5. dara says:

    thank you!

  6. Fantastic blog about Living Crafts Blog » Blog Archive » Teapot Ornament, it’s stopped me from doing any work

  7. 6 Weidera says:

    Jar Jar says: me likes your interesting publishing, haha.

  8. Elmo song says:

    so amazing!!! this is exactly the kind of stuff i am looking for :) thanks for this

  9. judy kielczewski says:

    I have to tell you this is the best site that I have found ever. I have worked in fiber,from owning a sewing alteration, shoe repair, making my own patterns, dying my own wool for rug hooking, kniting, teaching, etc. what do i have to do to get a job with you…Judy

  10. Cheryl says:

    I was looking in the second hand
    stores for small tea pots to hang on a
    Christmas tree. Now I can make my
    own and some for friends for Christmas
    next year. The friends that have shared
    tea and talk with me over the years.
    Thank you for the pattern.

  11. this is really smart…very nice..thanks for sharing tutorial…

  12. Janet W says:

    Oh my gosh – how adorable! I think I want to make one for each of my friends. So sweet!

  13. Maggie says:

    Adorable!!!

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