Search
SUBSCRIBE TO NEWSLETTER
Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon
Permission
Please do not reproduce images or content from this site without permission. Thank You!

Email the Editor
Categories
Archives

Archive for 'Tutorial'

A Knotty Valentine

Celtic knot work can be stunning in any form, and this beautiful knotted necklace is a great example.

The video tutorial explains the process so well, simplifying what looks like complex knot work.  In addition to Valentine’s Day gifts, wouldn’t these make lovely wedding tokens- as necklaces for the guests or bridesmaids, or as table decorations for candles, vases or glasses?

Or make a garland of love knots by using a longer length of rope….On our must do list!

 

Posted by Living Crafts on Jan 12, 2012 09:56 AM | 2 Comments

Merry Winter Stars

by Fiona Duthie

Merry Winter Stars are made of wool felt, simple stitches, and shiny beads, representing warmth, connection and light….everything we celebrate in this season.

Materials:

1  sheet wool felt 8″ x 10″ (20cm x 30cm) in ecru and lemon yellow, both from Pollika
cotton embroidery floss, gold metallic thread
small amount of wool for stuffing
assortment of beads and sequins
scissors, sewing needle

Merry Winter Stars Pattern available here as a pdf:  Merry Winter Stars

Cut out three stars from the wool felt. Two in Ecru and one in Yellow. Cut the inner lines on one of the ecru stars. Mark on the sewing points for making the folds on the inner line and outer edge.

Lay the stars one on top of the other in following order: ecru, yellow, ecru. Turn them to get the best match to each point. Trim the felt edges a little as necessary. Sew all three layers together, using blanket stitch.

Leave one side of one point open to stuff the star.

Stuff the stars in between the back ecru layer and the middle yellow layer. Use a knitting needle or bamboo skewer to move the wool all the way into the star tips.

Fold the point marked on the inner star line, out to the outer star edge and sew in place with a single stitch. Continue around each point on the star.

Fold down inner star tips. Do not stretch them all the way into the middle, allow then to form a little three dimensional petal.  Pin them in place, then sew to the yellow layer with a single stitch.

Add beads or sequins to the inner star points and the star center. Add some decorative stitches using the gold metallic thread. These are the little touches that really make the star shine.  Add as much or as little embellishment as you feel your star needs to reflect  it’s inner winter light!

This Merry Winter Star can be used as pin cushion, or sew on a long ribbon loop for a child to wear as a holiday necklace, or a short loop to use as a hanging decoration.

Wishing you, your friends and your families much Merry Winter Starlight – warmth, connection and light,and a peaceful, joy-filled holiday season!

Fiona Duthie

Fiona Duthie is a regular contributor to Living Crafts.

In her studio on Salt Spring Island, BC, she creates in a bountiful beauty of color, wool, and texture, inspired by the natural world. Fiona designs fine feltwork, felting and knitting patterns, gives workshops in natural craft, and runs her hand dyed, artisan fibre company, Kattikloo. You can read more about her fibers, projects and creative living at www.kattikloo.com and on Facebook.

Posted by Fiona Duthie on Dec 25, 2011 11:23 AM | 2 Comments

Jesus, Mary and Joseph Dolls and 4 Giveaway Kits

Designed by Lesley Cuming

Materials: All available from Pollika

Rope Doll Bases: 2 x 6inches/15cm,  1 x 4.5 inches/11 cm
Fresco Felt:  I sheet each, Sky, Marble, Spring,
True Felt: 1 sheet color #643
1 pack Bhedawool -Brown
Pencil Crayons in eye and mouth colors
Needle and Thread
Glue
Gold Wire
Brown Cord
Brown acrylic paint

Jesus, Mary and Joseph Pattern pieces: Download the Pattern here.

Mary and Joseph Dolls

Step 1: take a very small amount of brown acrylic paint, watered down. Paint Joseph’s face, feet and hands.

Step 2: using pencil crayons, draw on Joseph’s eyes, nose and mouth.

Step 3: position small amount of fleece wool on top of Joseph’s head, making sure not to cover his eyes. Shape a small triangle of fleece and glue to Joseph’s chin for a beard. Roll a very small amount of fleece into a mustache and glue above beard and mouth.

Step 4: cut out two tunic pieces, a front and a back, for Joseph’s tunic using Fresco Felt Spring,

Step 5: placing front and back together, sew from bottom hem to end of sleeve using running stitch.

Step 6: Using running stitch, sew from sleeve edge to neck.

Step 7: starting on opposite side, using running stitch, sew from hem to sleeve edge.

Step 8: place rope doll in tunic before sewing top edge of final sleeve. Using running stitch, carefully sew the final sleeve together

Step 9: tie cord around waist

Step 10: cut out scarf for head, using True Felt color #643.  Fold in half-length wise. Using running stitch sew along longest curved side

Step 11: turn head piece inside out, and position on Joseph’s head. Tie a brown cord around head and scarf to secure.

Repeat these steps for Mary, with the following changes:

For Mary’s hair, position fleece wool on top of Mary’s head, making sure not to cover her eyes or face too much. Glue into place. With a small amount of thread tie excess fleece at back like a pony tail.

Use Fresco Felt in Sky for her Tunic, and Fresco Felt in Marble for her cape.

Add Mary’s Halo: Using gold wire, wind in circles leaving small tail. Poke tail down seam of head dress to secure.

Baby Jesus Doll:

Step 1: using smaller rope doll, remove legs.

Step 2: with watered down acrylic paint add light color to baby’s face and hands

Step 3: with pencil crayons add eyes and mouth

Step 4: wrap baby in  Fresco Felt in Marble.

Step 5: sew halo on back of child’s head, sew bottom flap of blanket up. Place Baby in Mary’s arms.

GIVEAWAY

Pollika is generously offering four lucky readers each a complete kit to make the Jesus, Mary and Joseph dolls in this tutorial.  Each kit includes rope doll bases, wool felt sheets and wool batting for hair. For a chance to win,  please leave a comment on this post by 12/26/11.  Good luck!

Posted by Living Crafts on Dec 21, 2011 10:38 PM | 164 Comments

Tiny Treasures- Felt Painting Boards and Giveaway

Felt Painting Boards are the fifth project in a seasonal series of  little, quick-to-make gifts we so often need for the holidays. For planned or last minute occasions, for tooth fairies, pocket ladies, and winter fairs; for classmates, neighbour’s and host’s children; for advent calenders and stockings! Tiny treasures that can be made with a small amount of materials and a small amount of time- 20 minutes or less!

Painting with wool roving is such a warm, tactile and pleasing craft. Washes of color or detailed images- they all look lovely made with wool. And, most importantly, they can be changed at any time to become a whole new “painting”.  These little kits make fantastic creative gifts, not only for children! Make the felt board on a log cut, as we have, or on a piece of  finished wood, include a little pouch of colored wool, and the wool painting can start! We’ve included instructions below on making a simple tree image. It can be helpful to show children how to make an image first, to develop a hand and head understanding of how to use the materials….how to build up a picture, enjoy it, and then take it apart and make another!

Materials:

a log slice or piece of finished wood, about 5 inches in diameter or a 5 inch square. Log slices can often be obtained from craft supply shops. If you are cutting your own, make sure the wood is dry.

5″ x 5″ piece of wool felt.  A fluffy felt works especially well as a background to hold the paintings in place. A piece of felted blanket or sweater would work well, or National Non-Wovens wool felt in white dyed using this method.  All felt will work for this though!

small amounts in a rainbow of wool roving/batting colors

tiny twigs

wood glue

Cut a piece of wool felt to fit on the wooden base. Cut to a size so there is a nice wooden frame left visible around the wool felt.

Apply glue well over the entire back of the wool felt piece. Glue onto the wooden base. You may want to weight down the wool felt while it dries to get the best adhesion to the wood.

To make the wool tree painting:

First we need to lay down some earth for the tree to put down it’s roots and grow…

This step sets up the basic painting with wool technique- Use only very small wisps of wool. Hold down one side and draw or paint the wool out, pulling it where you want it to be on your board.

Push your twig tree trunk a little way into the earth, and roll a little on the felt base to hold it in place.

Paint the branches on your tree.  Hold the green woolly wisp at the top of the tree trunk and pull the wool out into boughs.  Add a few on each side and down the trunk.

We can make some decorations for our tree by using just a few wool fibers and rolling them into a ball between thumb and forefinger.  Drop them randomly onto the tree.

If it’s going to snow in your picture, pull out small white wool wisps of snow and have them fall in drifts across the ground and on a few boughs. When the snow melts and the holidays are over, the snow and decorations can be taken off the tree.

Or maybe the whole tree will come off and the wool and twig be made into something completely different.  Here are some ideas:

These wool paintings can be hung on a wall, displayed on a table or mantlepiece, or hung on your tree. It can be changed through the day or the year to create new seasonal pictures. Ideal for travelling, during appointments, or family gatherings.

You can read more about painting with wool in Living Crafts- Fall 2008.

Watch for more in our Tiny Treasures series- we’ll be featuring at least one new tutorial each week until Christmas,  including wooden castle blocks, and poppy pod people, plus other small and simple natural gift making inspirations.

Enjoy our earlier tutorials in this series:  Tiny Toadstools, Rainbow Rocks, Frost Gnomes and  Pinecone Gnomes.

Giveaway

National Non-Wovens has generously offered a wool felt assortment pack for the lucky winner! Their gift includes a collection of gorgeous colors in 100% wool felt sheets!

Please leave a comment on this post by Thursday, December 15 for a chance to win this wonderful giveaway.

—————————————————————————————-

Fiona Duthie

Fiona Duthie is a regular contributor to Living Crafts.

In her studio on Salt Spring Island, BC, she creates in a bountiful beauty of color, wool, and texture, inspired by the natural world. Fiona designs fine feltwork, felting and knitting patterns, gives workshops in natural craft, and runs her hand dyed, artisan fibre company, Kattikloo. You can read more about her fibers, projects and creative living at www.kattikloo.com and on Facebook.

Posted by Fiona Duthie on Dec 11, 2011 09:47 PM | 397 Comments

Tiny Treasures- Frost Gnomes and Giveaway

Frost Gnomes are the third project in a seasonal series of  little, quick-to-make gifts we so often need for the holidays. For planned or last minute occasions, for tooth fairies, pocket ladies, and winter fairs; for classmates, neighbour’s and host’s children; for advent calenders and stockings! Tiny treasures that can be made with a small amount of materials and a small amount of time- 20 minutes or less!

We love making these tiny frost gnomes, to adorn a gift, slip into a stocking or even hide in the forest or garden for someone small to find. They are made in icy, crystal colors of wool felt, and have a Swarovski crystal atop their cap. They fit happily in a pocket or purse and are lovely for little stories in the car, in line at the grocery store, or on holiday visits.

Materials:

small amounts of wool felt in icy colors. Shown here are pastel blue, lavender, lilac and ecru, all from BearDance Crafts.

wooden peg person 1 11/16″ tall x 5/8″ base, available at Stockade, Woodworks Ltd., Caseys Wood Products, or most local craft stores.

sewing needle and threads to match felt

glue

a small length of mohair yarn (about 16 inches) or wool locks

optional: Swarovski crystal or glittery crystal bead

Frost Gnome Pattern Pieces

Apply a small amount of glue over the body. Wrap the tunic around the body and sew up the back of the tunic using whip or blanket stitch. Sew around the neck of the tunic using running stitch. Pull tight to gather the tunic around the neck.

Sew across the top of the cape using running stitch. Leave long ends on both sides to tie the cape securely around the neck.

Apply glue around the back of the head and a little under the chin. Wrap the mohair yarn around the head- higher at the back and under the chin at the front.

Sew the crystal or bead to the tip of the hat. Fold the hat in half and sew up the back using blanket stitch.

Apply a ring of glue around the inside rim of the hat. Slip the hat onto the Frost Gnome’s head until it is in just the right position. If he gets any glue on his face, gently wash it off before it dries. A clean frost gnome is a happy frost gnome!  Allow the glue to dry for at least one hour (ideally 6-12 hours) before play.

Watch for more in our Tiny Treasures series- we’ll be featuring at least one new tutorial each week until Christmas,  including wooden castle blocks, wool painting boards, and poppy pod people, plus other small and simple natural gift making inspirations.

Enjoy our earlier tutorials in this series:  Tiny Toadstools, Rainbow Rocks

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Bear Dance Crafts is giving away a collection of 5 holiday craft kits from Atelier Pippilotta to one lucky Living Crafts blog visitor.
Included in the giveaway are the kits: Little Star Child, Three Little Angels, Little Winter Hut, Three Holly Children and Three Little Light Bearer’s.

These are such sweet kits- to make yourself for your loved ones, or as a perfect crafty gift for a creative friend.
Please leave a comment by Thursday, December 8th, sharing your favorite holiday decoration, to be entered in the draw.

Use the comments section below the full tutorial post, rather than the individual picture of the giveaway- Thanks, and Good Luck!

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

Fiona Duthie

Fiona Duthie is a regular contributor to Living Crafts.

In her studio on Salt Spring Island, BC, she creates in a bountiful beauty of color, wool, and texture, inspired by the natural world. Fiona designs fine feltwork, felting and knitting patterns, gives workshops in natural craft, and runs her hand dyed, artisan fibre company, Kattikloo. You can read more about her fibers, projects and creative living at www.kattikloo.com and on Facebook.

Posted by Fiona Duthie on Dec 5, 2011 12:48 PM | 247 Comments

Tiny Treasures- Rainbow Rocks

Rainbow Rocks are the second project in a seasonal series of  little, quick-to-make gifts we so often need for the holidays. For planned or last minute occasions; for tooth fairies, pocket ladies, and winter fairs; for classmates, neighbour’s and host’s children; for advent calenders and stockings! Tiny treasures that can be made with a small amount of materials and a small amount of time- 20 minutes or less!

Children love to make these felt geodes, and are always amazed when they are cut open. We have been making these to be given out at our Winter Faire, along with a short story about The Rainbow Rock, and instructions on how to “break” them open.

Materials:

0.5 ounces/  13 grams assorted colors of wool roving

small piece of bubble wrap

dish soap, warm water, bowl

Use a small amount of wool roving and wrap the roving tightly into a ball about the size of a cherry or grape.

Wrap the ball with another color of wool roving. It can be helpful to divide the roving along the length into thin strips, to make it easier to wrap evenly. Continue adding layers of color, completely covering the ball with each new layer. To help keep the ball evenly shaped, roll it in your hands for a minute or so, after adding each new layer. This is a wonderful tactile experience for children.  Add about 5-6 layers of color, or until the ball is about the size of an orange. If you want your Rainbow Rock to look like a stone, finish with a layer of white wool roving and then grey or brown for the last layer.

 Holding the wool ball securely in both hands, dip it gently into a bowl of soapy water. A good felting mixture is 1Tablespoon of dish soap to 1 quart (1 litre) of water.

Hold the wool ball in both hands and  gently squeeze the wool while cupping it. This will help to keep the wool in place and after about 5 minutes of squeezing, a felt “skin”will develop. It is important not to roll or squeeze the delicate wool ball too much at the beginning.  Dip into the bowl as necessary to add a more water and soap. The wool ball should roll easily in your hands, with some lather on the surface, and be wet all the way through.

For about 15 minutes, alternate between rolling the wool ball in your hands, rolling it on your bubble wrap piece, and squeezing it. Apply more pressure as you work to increase the felting.

If you working on these as a group, especially with young children, pass the felt stones around in a circle, each taking a turn to work on each one. In this way stronger hands get to work on the wool stone and help with the felting.  This also adds a playful co-operative element to the craft, and keeps children engaged in the activity.  Just remember which one is yours, so everyone ends with their own one back!

Once the wool rock feels quite firm, rinse well, squeezing under running water to get out the soap.  Then finish the felting by rolling the wool rock under your hand on a towel, to get out any excess water.

Shape into your desired stone shape and leave to dry.

Use very sharp scissors or a kitchen knife to cut open the Rainbow Rock. Start with cutting into the rock , just under the surface, making tiny clips with the points of the scissors. Continue working around the rock in this way, cutting a little deeper with each round. Children love to see the layers opening as you go.

Once you’ve cut in through about three layers, you can probably cut the remaining layers all at once by cutting the Rainbow Rock in half.

Open up and take a moment to enjoy the array of colors and shapes formed through the felting.

We first made these when my oldest son was three years old. We passed a thread through the top of each half and used them as Christmas ornaments.

Watch for more in our Tiny Treasures series- we’ll be featuring at least one new tutorial each week until Christmas,  including wooden castle blocks, tiny frost gnomes, and poppy pod people, plus other small and simple natural gift making inspirations.

If you’d like to accompany this craft with a story, you could read  The Rainbow Rock . This story would also be nice to go along with a real crystal geode as a special Tiny Treasure!

Fiona Duthie

Fiona Duthie is a regular contributor to Living Crafts.

In her studio on Salt Spring Island, BC, she creates in a bountiful beauty of color, wool, and texture, inspired by the natural world. Fiona designs fine feltwork, felting and knitting patterns, gives workshops in natural craft, and runs her hand dyed, artisan fibre company, Kattikloo. You can read more about her fibers, projects and creative living at www.kattikloo.com and on Facebook.

Posted by Fiona Duthie on Nov 26, 2011 06:07 PM | 21 Comments

Tiny Treasures- Quick Natural Gifts in 20 minutes or less…

This is the first in a seasonal series of projects and ideas for those little, quick-to-make gifts we so often need for the holidays. For planned or last minute occasions; for tooth fairies, pocket ladies, and winter fairs; for classmates, neighbour’s and host’s children; for advent calenders and stockings! Tiny treasures that can be made with a small amount of materials and a small amount of time- 20 minutes or less!

Our first tiny treasure are these magical needle felted toadstools, lovely for many occasions as gifts and as seasonal home decorations or a nature table.

Materials:

small amount (0.1 ounce- 3-4 grams) white wool roving and red wool roving -or color of your choice. A fairy dyed wool gives a lovely woodland effect.

felting needle

sponge

Use a piece of wool roving that is about the size of your hand. Roll it up so that it is about the thickness of your thumb, and about 4 inches (10 cm) long.

Needle felt all over one half of the length of the toadstool stem, turning it regularly to keep it round. Leave the wool at the other end of the stem unfelted.

Using a sponge as work surface is really helpful with these small crafts. Try to always be felting  with the sponge under where you are working- it can be tempting to pick up the toadstool and work with it in your hands, but this often results in more needle pricks- and they hurt!

Needlefelt the bottom of the toadstool stem by felting well into the end. Alternate working around the the stem, and flattening the bottom of the stem, until it is very firmly felted.

Wrap the red or colored wool around the unfelted part of the white stem. Be sure and cover all the white at the top of the toadstool. Add more wool at the bottom of the toadstool cap to create a conical shape.

Needlefelt all over the toadstool cap, turning regularly to maintain the shape. Work the needle well into the wool, to create a solid felted top.

Try working with the needle at diffrent angles to help shape the toadstool top-just always be sure to bring the needle out at the same angle as it went in. Felting needles are brittle and can break if angle is changed or used to pry the fibers.

Felt into the underside of the toadstool cap. Keep felting wherever more is needed to make a firm felt, making sure the needle is going right into the wool.

Add some dots to the toadstool cap by using the tiniest anount of wool, and just needling it right in the middle of the fibers- in the same spot. Most the wool will be drawn into the toadstool. Then you can felt in any stray fibers around that central spot. This creates a nice dot, without making an indent or crater in the surface.

Run over the surface of the toadstool with your thumbnail to remove any needle felting marks.  A tiny treasure, ready to be given and enjoyed!

Watch for more of our Tiny Treasures series- we’ll be featuring at least one new tutorial each week until Christmas,  plus other small and simple natural gift making inspirations.

GIVEAWAY

Please leave a comment on this post by Tuesday, November 22nd, and receive 4 years of Living Crafts! Your package will include all of our 16 quarterly issues starting witht he Premier Issue, Winter 2008 and ending with Fall 2011.  The lucky winner will be chosen through a randomizer, and announced following day.

 

We have a winner!

Patty P. Submitted on 2011/11/18 at 5:59 am

How adorable. These would be cute tree ornaments as well. Let me get my needles!
Thanks for the amazing creativity Living Crafts gives! The magazine is awesome.

 

Fiona Duthie

Fiona Duthie is a regular contributor to Living Crafts.

In her studio on Salt Spring Island, BC, she creates in a bountiful beauty of color, wool, and texture, inspired by the natural world. Fiona designs fine feltwork, felting and knitting patterns, gives workshops in natural craft, and runs her hand dyed, artisan fibre company, Kattikloo. You can read more about her fibers, projects and creative living at www.kattikloo.com and on Facebook.

Posted by Fiona Duthie on Nov 16, 2011 10:04 AM | 381 Comments

Sasha Kagan’s Scotty Dog Sweater and Beret

Doesn’t this gorgeous sweater and beret make you want cold weather right now? This is a perfect knitting project to start now to get ready for Old Man Winter who will be here before you know it!

These are both designs from Sasha Kagan’s Classic Collection by Sasha Kagan, published by The Tauton Press in 2011. Click here to download a free PDF tutorial.

Sasha Kagan’s Classic CollectionPhototgrapher credit: Chris Gloag.

This book is a collection of Kagan’s most iconic designs that span over the last forty years. Known best for her use of color and innovative intarsia designs to create striking patterns and motifs, Kagan’s designs have passed the test of time to become true classics in their own right. Kagan’s patterns are organized by four decades, offering you 5 designs from each decade, from 1969 to 2009.   All designs are updated and reworked in contemporary yarns so you can find them readily in stores.

GIVEAWAY

The folks at Taunton Press have offered a copy of this beautiful book as a giveaway to our readers.  For a chance to win a copy sent to you in the U.S. please leave a comment on this post by Friday, October 14th.  Winner will be announced Monday.

Posted by Living Crafts on Oct 12, 2011 10:53 AM | 128 Comments

Needle Felted Pomegranate

By Laura Lee Burch 

The pomegranate symbolizes fruitfulness, learning, knowledge and wisdom. Inside the pomegranate are many, many crunchy, tart but sweet tasting red seeds and this is the part that you eat. The seeds are eaten by themselves (snack), put into salads or squeezed for their juice.

Needle felted vessels are easy to make, they’re useful and they make great gifts! It helps to look at a photo as you make your piece or better yet, if they’re in season, have a real pomegranate in front of you while you create.

Pomegranate Vessel 15″ diameter x 7.5″ tall

Materials:

Red wool (approximately 30g)

White wool (approximately 20g)

Poly fiber-fill or core wool  (approximately 50g)

Sponge felting surface

Felting needles-medium gauge

Felting needle handles (for 4 to 10 needles is preferable)

Sewing thread to wrap shapes

scissors

1. With sewing thread, wrap poly fiber-fill or core wool into a firm ball (15″ diameter). Felt red wool over the entire ball.

2. Cut the ball in half with scissors. To hollow out the ball, pull out the core of poly fiber- fill or core wool from both halves of the ball. It’s very important not to pull too much of the poly fiber-fill out or the sides with be weak and floppy.

3. With white wool, needle felt the inside halves of the ball, felt till firm and smooth. Sculpt the insides of the ball into bowl shapes, emphasize felting in the curved areas of the interiors of the ball. Hold the two halves next to each other while felting to help make both sides the same. Felt red wool along the edges.

4. With sewing thread, wrap a handful of poly fiber fill or core wool for the knob at the top of the pomegranate. Cover the knob with red wool, needle felt till firm and smooth, leave the bottom of the shape unfelted so it can be felted/attached to the top of the pomegranate easier.

5. Place the red knob on the top half of the pomegranate, needle felt into place. Cover the area where the two shapes meet with  red wool, needle felt around the connecting area to make the connection seamless.

6. To make the flaps on top of the pomegranate, take 5 tufts of wool. Find the center of each tuft and fold both sides down to make a triangular shape. Needle felt the triangles till firm and smooth.

7. With scissors, cut out the center of the pomegranate knob. Needle felt the flaps around the top of the knob. Fill in the hollowed out area with red wool and needle felt till firm and smooth.

Laura Lee Burch, originally from Greenfield, Indiana, lives with her husband and three daughters in Tel Aviv, Israel.  A graphic designer and illustrator by training, she is an avid crafter and sewing designer, and the author of two sewing books on children’s clothing and accessories.  You can contact her by visiting her website LauraLeeBurch.com.

Posted by Living Crafts on Oct 9, 2011 01:24 PM | 16 Comments

Baby Booties – Knitting for Little Feet

These adorable booties are just the thing for winter! With the holidays coming soon this would be a great gift for you to knit for a baby in your family.  This pattern is one of 40 booties, socks, and slippers for babies and kids, in the Knitting for Little Feet book by Trafalgar Square Books.  As you turn the pages of this book, you’ll keep changing your favorite until the end.  Full review in the upcoming Fall 2011 issue of Living Crafts.

All My Clothes Are Green

Level of Difficulty

Intermediate

Size

12 months (approx)

(see page 127 for size measurements)

Materials

Yarn: Regia 4-ply (75% wool/25% polyamide, 50 g, 230 yds / 210 m) pine (327) = color 1 for the sole and Chinese lantern (1111) = color 3 for instep

Regia 4-ply, small amounts fern (1092) = color 2

Needles: set of 5 dpn or 48 in / 120 cm Magic loop circular U.S. size 1.5 / 2.5 mm

Gauge

30 sts and 42 rnds in stockinette = 4 x 4 in /
10 x 10 cm.

Adjust needle size to obtain correct gauge.

Stitch Patterns

Stockinette

Worked back and forth: Knit on RS and purl
on WS.

In the round: Knit all rounds.

Garter Stitch

Garter Stitch worked back and forth:
Knit all rows.

Garter Stitch in the round: Alternately
knit 1 rnd and purl 1 rnd.

Instructions:

Sole

Color 1: work back and forth in garter st from the toe to the heel.

CO 4 sts with provisional cast on (see page 117).

Rows 1-9: On every other row, M1 after the first and before the last st of row = 14 sts.

Rows 10-29: Knit.

Row 30: Dec 1 st each at beg and end of row = 12 sts rem.

Rows 31-39: Knit.

Row 40: Dec 1 st each at beg and end of row = 10 sts rem.

Rows 41-59: Knit.

Row 60: Dec 1 st each at beg and end of row = 8 sts rem.

Row 61: Knit.

Row 62: Dec 1 st each at beg and end of row = 6 sts rem.

Row 63: K3 to center of heel. Pick up and knit sts around the sole for a total of 72 sts.

Mark the center of heel and tip of toe. If working on a circular ndl, at the center of toe, pull out a ndl cable-loop so that you can continue knitting in the round in two separate sections. (Magic Loop method)

Side of Foot

Work in the round, beg at center back. Knit 1 rnd with color 1 = continue with the existing color.

Purl 1 rnd with color 1, knit 4 rnds with color 2, knit 1 rnd with color 3. These rounds begin and end at center of toe.

Instep

Now work short rows in stockinette st. Mark
center toe and heel, and on either side of each marker should be 24 sts, 48 total.

The 12 sts to the right and to the left of the heel marker (24 sts) are put on hold. The instep will be worked on the rem 24 sts (12 on either side of the toe marker). Beg at center of toe, k3; turn, yo, (see page 76).  For this yarnover, wrap the yarn around the cable after the turn, at the beginning of the row. At the end of the row, this loop will always be knit together with the next stitch and
1 stitch will be increased (an increase of 2 sts in every row). On the RS, slip the yarnover, knit the next st and pass slipped st over. Continue with short row shaping until there are 16 sts on
working needle (8 sts on either side of the center of toe).

Now from the existing 16 sts, work 15 sts, k3tog (16th st + yarnover + 1 st from holder).

On RS, work as follows: Sl 1 rem st + yarnover together, k 1 st from holder and pass over
slipped sts.

Now work to place marked between the heel
and instep. Beg working in the round again and, on every rnd, join the last st on holder with the first instep st and the last instep st with the next st on holder until 48 sts rem. Work 4 rnds in
stockinette over these 48 sts to begin leg and then continue in k2/p2 ribbing until leg is desired length.

Make the other shoe the same way.

GIVEAWAY

Knit Little Feet

We have a copy of Knitting for Little Feet to give to one lucky Living Crafts visitor. Just leave a comment to this post to be entered to win! Deadline to enter is Sunday, October 9, 2011 at midnight Pacific Time. We will announce the winner on Wednesday. Good luck!

 

We Have a Winner!

Patty Manders Submitted on 2011/10/07 at 1:25 pm

Can’t think of anything finer than warm little feet in hand knit little socks! Got to keep my fingers crossed that this book might just be in my future:)

Congratulations Patty!

 

Posted by Living Crafts on Oct 5, 2011 09:31 AM | 300 Comments























  




© 2010-2011 Living Crafts Blog.
All original images and text on this website are copyright and the property of Living Crafts Inc. and LivingCrafts.com